Differences in Motivating Factors for SARS-CoV-2 Vaccination and Perceptions of Infection Risk among Healthcare and EMS Personnel in South Carolina.

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From: Southern Medical Journal(Vol. 115, Issue 6)
Publisher: Southern Medical Association
Document Type: Article
Length: 462 words

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Abstract :

Byline: Mirinda Ann Gormley, From the Department of Public Health Sciences, Clemson University College of Behavioral, Social, and Health Sciences, Clemson, South Carolina, the Department of Internal Medicine, Prisma Health, Greenville, South Carolina, the University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Greenville, South Carolina, the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, the University of South Carolina Arnold School of Public Health, Columbia, and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia.; Melissa S. Nolan; Moonseong Heo; Alain H. Litwin; Arnold Alier; Virginie Daguise Abstract OBJECTIVES: Although medical workers were prioritized to receive the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination, many have declined. Even though studies have investigated differences in COVID-19-related attitudes and vaccination for workers in hospitals and long-term care facilities, none have included emergency medical services (EMS) personnel. We investigated the association between type of medical worker (EMS vs healthcare worker [HCW]) and COVID-19 vaccination, vaccine beliefs, vaccine motivators, personal protection behaviors, and risk perceptions. METHODS: The data for self-identified HCWs came from surveys distributed to randomly selected residents of South Carolina and EMS personnel recruited at a targeted surveillance testing event during the South Carolina EMS Symposium. Pearson Îç2 and Fisher exact tests analyzed differences in the distribution of demographic characteristics and self-reported COVID-19 vaccination attitudes by medical workers. Multivariable logistic regression assessed the association between COVID-19 vaccination and type of medical worker, adjusting for age, sex, race, and frontline status, and assessed the associations among vaccine beliefs, vaccine motivators, personal protection behaviors, and risk perceptions by type of medical worker, adjusting for age, sex, race, frontline status, and vaccination status. RESULTS: Of the 126 respondents 57.9% were EMS, 42.1% were HCWs, and 73.6% of the cohort were self-reported frontline medical workers. Approximately two-thirds of respondents received a vaccine for COVID-19, with no significant differences between EMS and HCWs; however, EMS workers were significantly less likely to receive the vaccination out of concern about exposures at work/school (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.08-0.57), concern about exposures within the community (aOR 0.18, 95% CI 0.07-0.48), or to do their part to control the pandemic (aOR 0.20, 95% CI 0.06-0.69). EMS workers also were significantly less likely to wear a mask all/most of the time when outside the home (aOR 0.04, 95% CI 0.0-0.21) and less concerned about the spread of COVID-19 in their community as compared with HCWs (aOR 0.19, 95% CI 0.06-0.56). CONCLUSIONS: EMS personnel were significantly less concerned about the spread of COVID-19 in their community and significantly less likely to wear a mask all/most of the time while outside the home as compared with HCWs. Differences in the COVID-19-related attitudes and personal protection behaviors of EMS personnel should be used to develop targeted interventions to increase vaccine motivation and adherence to personal protection protocols.

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Gale Document Number: GALE|A704173199